Douglass-Clark House

Initially constructed as a home for Elmore Douglass and his family around 1786, the Douglass-Clark House was jointly used as one of Sumner County’s earliest courthouses between 1788-1790. Many different kinds of cases were tried at the house and many of the area’s earliest residents visited the house for such hearings. Andrew Jackson, who later became president, tried several cases at the property in his early law career between 1789-1790. The house and property were later sold by Elmore Douglass, eventually ending up in the ownership of his brother Reuben Douglass.

The Clark family was the next generation to occupy the house beginning in 1831 when Emma Douglass, daughter of Reuben Douglass, married William Clark. During their years in the house, the Clark family persevered after the premature death of William Clark in 1847 and witnessed the declaration of the Civil War in 1861. Four of the Clark brothers enlisted on behalf of the Confederate cause.

Of the four young Clark men that enlisted, only one returned home after the close of the war. Slavery was also deeply intertwined with the history of the Douglass-Clark House as documentation listed enslaved persons living at the property as early as 1790.

We invite you to visit the Douglass-Clark House to hear the stories of those generations and reflect upon how their lives shaped our world today.

Douglass-Clark House Visitor Information Center

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 9:00am – 4:30pm
Closed major holidays & the third full week in January
Location: 2115 Long Hollow Pike, Gallatin, TN 37066
Cost: Free

Contact us with any questions at taryn@visitsumnertn.com or at 615-991-5119.